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Pizzeria With Controversial ‘Ground Zero Pizza’ Apologizes

Pizzeria With Controversial ‘Ground Zero Pizza’ Apologizes


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Bravo Pizza in New York City has taken its Ground Zero Pizza off the menu after a series of complaints

New Yorkers were not amused by the 9/11 reference in this pizza.

A New York Pizzeria was forced to change the name of one of its pizzas when locals became outraged over tragedy appropriation. Bravo Pizza in the Flatiron District — a small pizza chain known for its doughy Sicilian slices — faced a deluge of complaints and criticisms when it debuted a Ground Zero Deep Dish pie, and the pizza was soon taken off the menu.

“We took it off the menu because we didn’t want to offend people,” owner Mike Steinberg told The Daily News. “My uncle is a firefighter. We take care of the firefighters, and the police.”

The new pizza name was meant to be a part of Bravo’s image renovation. The pizzeria will be rebranding itself as Big Slice of New York and other menu items have Big Apple-themed names like Empire State Chicken and SOHO BBQ Chicken, according to the initial report in Gothamist.

Many customers were not offended by the name, Steinberg says, but others felt it was tactless to name a pizza after the site of the horrific 9/11 tragedy.


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


An Angry Internet Descends on Indiana Pizzeria over Religious Freedom Law

The owners of Memories Pizza were some of the first Indiana businesspeople to publicly support the state’s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, according to a report by the Associated Press. While Crystal O’Connor, the pizzeria’s co-owner, told a local ABC-TV affiliate Tuesday that her family-owned pizzeria would serve a gay couple in the restaurant, she said they would not cater a gay wedding since it would be against her family’s Christian beliefs.

That story went viral, and those who disagreed with Memories Pizza’s stance on gay wedding catering took to the restaurant’s Yelp page. They overran it with joking one-star reviews and posted several graphic images featuring nude men and satirical Christian memes (link NSFW). A parody website filled with anti-homophobic content – memoriespizza.com – was also created Wednesday to protest the restaurant owner’s statement (also NSFW).

TMZ reported Wednesday afternoon that threatening phone calls and posts on social media have also forced the O’Connors to temporarily close their restaurant, until the furor dies down.

Interestingly, Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman last week posted a blog condemning the new Indiana law.

"It is unconscionable to imagine that Yelp would create, maintain, or expand a significant business presence in any state that encouraged discrimination by businesses against our employees, or consumers at large,” he wrote. “I encourage states that are considering passing laws like the one rejected by Arizona or adopted by Indiana to reconsider and abandon these discriminatory actions.”


Watch the video: 64. Pizza Expo Mini Sessions: Two Visionary Pizzerias (June 2022).


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